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20110701
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into radio instead of television, and she became an npr reporter, and her beat was covering this dispute that scooter libby/jude at this time miller thing. and i remember hearing one of her reports on the radio, i think it was after libby was convicted of perjury and the other fences, and she said that's what happened to louis libby. this is libby lewis reporting. [laughter] anyway, judy miller who had been subpoenaed by a grand jury that was investigating who the source of the leak of the identity of valerie plame was. valerie plame was an undercover cia agent, and her identity was leaked after her husband had debunked the administration's claim that saddam hussein was seeking nuclear material this africa. in africa. the court refused to hear the case in 2005 and left miller in jail. that was a big story because everybody had anticipated that the court would clarify and needed to clarify the extent to which reporters are able to protect their confidential sources. but in the miller case it was a disi ponte -- disappointing nondecision, just a refusal to take the case. the only case that
at npr. skip over our speaker for a moment, over the podium as well, melissa sharp with new silk media. she is our fantastic speakers committee chair. skip over our second speaker for a moment, the key to seem to press secretary with the natural resources defense council. also the organizer of today's event. we thank you for that, bob. we are told that it is a vote and we are awaiting another guest of the speaker, congressman brad miller of north carolina. then moving on down, andrea stone, correspondent for "huffington post." glow is washington director of reporters without borders and a vital member of our press freedom member and al isley is editor at large who tells me been blogging for "huffington post" since day one. now please a large amount of applause for everyone. [applause] >> if there were a king and queen of online journalism, our headline to a guest speakers could be considered candidates for members of the royal family. when tim armstrong and arianna huffington announced aol's purchase of "huffington post" in february it marked not just yet another reshaping of aol but a
to talk radio any more. npr may be. you filter your sources and surround yourself with people who are your fellow conservatives. libertarians or whatever we are borg you -- everything gets filtered through that. because we are so tribal we also feel good about this like we are right and they are wrong. not that we are right. we are morally right and we are better than them and everybody does this. including scientist. every scientist would love for his eerie to be true. it is how you advance your career and how you move up the academic ladder and you have made an important discovery. so of course, scientists are going to be usually subject to do the confirmation bias. i guess we will talk about bias in science. is a problem, but it is a bigger problem in all the other areas of life religion, politics, economics and social attitudes because it leaves science has a systematic way of getting out the truth and trying to avoid those kinds of cognitive biases. it is not perfect but if you don't look for your disconfirming evidence i can assure you somebody else will usually with great glee in a
it is people npr? why not just concentrate on the basic? >> i don't believe so. like it or not they me have a strong interest in policing. they put significant demands on the metropolitan police and officers are doing their investigation, wanting information. the police officers would be spending their time trying to deal with that approach. and i feel a having press officers in place, that we are able to take the pressure off the investigative officers to get on with their jobs, and if the main press officers -- [inaudible] >> could some savings be made in your department? >> there's always savings to be made. my department has contributed in the last 10 years. >> could we make a quick, please? >> mr. fedorcio, you were the main contact at the met with some of these journalist. your name all over meetings. it's important to be transparent about these things and the met has a publication about what we've are discussed. when i look on line however, it appeared as no gift hostile these passionate hospitality since 2009. 12 lunches, two dinners. was what's going on, were you trying to not tell
times, watch c-span, listen to npr. however, also read your history. >> well, i also read "the wall street journal" as well as "the new york times" to get a balanced view. [laughter] >> and our friends at the journal will like that. >> yeah. >> um, if founders were somehow magically transported here today, what would they recognize, and what would shock them? >> well, the question you ask is interesting in itself. i give a talk to people like this audience here, and inevitably someone will say, well, what would thomas jefferson think of affirmative action, or what would george washington think of the invasion of iraq? i mean, those are really fascinating questions that people, ordinary people will ask. and, you know, you can't imagine other countries doing that. i mean, i don't think anyone in england would say, well, what would one of the two william pitts' think of david cameron's goth? they just wouldn't ask that. so we have an intimate connection. and historians have mocked that. and i don't mock it. lincoln had that connection, however, and it's not so easy to mock lincoln. he
wants to challenge me, give me a break, it's legal now. the npr reporter explained that the teacher now discusses gay sex with students tore rowly and explicitly with a chart in the 8th grade. i feel like i'm representing parents who have not been invited to speak who have a seriously held religious view that marriage is between one man and woman and they want to protect their young children against other views. robin in 2006 had their 7-year-old son joey come home to tell about a book the teacher read to the 1st grade class on same-sex relationships. they thought he was mistaken at first. the request the school inform them about such presentations, and they were turned down. another couple, david and tonya parker had a worse result when questioning the teaching of the same-sex issues to their young son. mr. parker found himself in jail. i'm trying to be a good dad parker said after the arrangement. they were christians attempting to follow their faith. we're not intoller rapt said his wife. we love all people. that's part of our faith, but see the judge ruled in that case, the case of
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